1. What would you like the U.S. discretionary budget to look like? With 60% now going to militarism, what percentage would you like that to be?

2. What program of economic conversion to peaceful enterprises would you support?

3. Would you end, continue, or escalate U.S. war making in: Afghanistan? Iraq? Syria? Yemen? Pakistan? Libya? Somalia?

4. Would you end the exemption for militarism in Kyoto, Paris, and other climate agreements?

 

 

Remarks at the Resource Center for Nonviolence in Santa Cruz, Calif., on October 12, 2018.

Video slowly uploading will be at https://youtu.be/jKhnteeo4k8

Exactly at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, in 1918, 100 years ago this coming November 11th, people across Europe suddenly stopped shooting guns at each other. Up until that moment, they were killing and taking bullets, falling and screaming, moaning and dying, from bullets and from poison gas.

Wilfred Owen put it this way:

Blue backgrouond with hummingbird art at a flower and words Gift to be Simple, and words Come together break through

Sunday, October 14, 5-8pm, TRISM, 1636 N. High St.

Gift to Be Simple is Simply Living’s premier annual fundraiser, but it is more than that. It is an opportunity to learn, to share, and to enjoy healthy, quality food together. The chefs of TRISM, an A&R Creative Group enterprise well known for The Crest Gastropubs, will prepare a variety of appetizers; desserts will be provided by Cornucopia and there will be a cash bar. Anna and The Consequences will entertain us again with their jazz, pop, and blues music.

Tickets for the event are $50 and include an annual membership. For those who are unable to attend or who want to make an additional donation to their ticket purchase, please note the “Donation” option. To pay for tickets at the door, go to the “Ticket” button, select “Payment,” use the drop-down menu and select “Pay at the door.” This helps TRISM so that they will prepare the correct amount of food!

There were two simultaneous Brett Kavanaugh stories. Together, as part of the confirmation process regarding his nomination as Supreme Court Justice, they revealed how political discourse in the United States has reached a new low, with debate over the man’s possible predilection to make judgments based on his own preferences rather than the US Constitution being ignored in favor of the politically motivated kabuki theater that was deliberately arranged to avoid that issue and instead go after his character.

Director Damien Chazelle has had a meteoric rise in the Hollywood firmament. His 2014 hit Whiplash had a $3.3 million production budget and earned more than $13 million at the box office, while 2016’s La La Land cost $30 million. Presumably because that musical scored five times its costs, Chazelle’s latest movie, First Man, almost doubled La La Land’s budget. I usually don’t dwell on film finances and focus instead on cinematic aesthetics, social commentary, film history and the like, but in the case of First Man the movie’s money matters have impacted upon its style - and in a mostly negative way.

 

The film’s title character is Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling), the first man to step foot on the moon. Like Miles Teller’s wannabe drummer in Whiplash and Emma Stone’s aspiring actress and Gosling’s striving jazz pianist in La La Land, First Man’s protagonist is - in this case, literally - reaching for the stars, against impossible odds.

 

 

In Dubious Battle - More militant than and written before The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck depicted a bitter Red-led strike in California’s orchards in his 1936 novel. James Franco stars in and directed this neglected 2016 gem with Selena Gomez, Robert Duvall, Ed Harris, Bryan Cranston (who previously portrayed blacklisted screenwriter Dalton Trumbo), Vincent D’Onofrio.

 

WHAT: Screening of In Dubious Battle; 113 minutess. Film historian/critic Ed Rampell intros the film, followed by Q&A.

 

WHEN: Doors open 7:00 p.m., program starts by 7:30 p.m., on Thursday, Oct. 25.

 

Where: The L.A. Workers Center, 1251 S. St. Andrews Place, L.A., CA 90019. Refreshments served. Donations requested.

 

Two green leafy marijuana plants in pots

Saturday, October 13, 6:30-11pm
1021 E. Broad St., east side door
Parking in rear lot, side driveway or in front
Socialize and network with progressive friends, music, art, and a presentation on CBD and medical marijuana. 
Free, no RSVP required. 
614-253-2571, colsfreepress@gmail.com

Pink and black poster with details about the event

Sat,  Oct 13, 7-10pm
Dirty Dungarees Laundromat and Bar, 2586 N High St
WCRS LP Presents Witches BrewHAHA: A fundraiser showcase of local female musicians! Come support community radio and listen to local ladies!

Featuring:
She's So-
https://shesso.bandcamp.com/releases

Megan Taylorhttps://megantaylormusic.bandcamp.com/

Black man with gray hair and sunglasses and the words Is Said

Saturday, October 13, 7-9pm, Ohio History Center, 800 E. 17th Ave.

Author, mentor, community-based activist, and educator, Is Said provides sage leadership on a national level as well as in the greater Columbus arts community. He conceives, stages, writes, and performs unique multimedia arts events, combining visionary, historical-based poetry or prose synergistically with high-energy African music and dance. Founding the Columbus-based “Advance Party” in 1973, he brings to life a powerful, spiritual vision to inspire, inform, and empower diverse audiences. With an inclusive multicultural approach, Is Said serves formally and informally as consultant to many arts agencies and individuals, seeking his wisdom born of a lifetime of community experience. He shares his expertise with school-age or homeless youth, growing artists, and senior citizens, conducting educational workshops that foster literacy, creativity, performance skills, and, most importantly, self-awareness. Is Said received the King Arts Complex 24th Annual Legends and Legacies Award in 2011.

Black man with gray hair and sunglasses and the words Is Said

Saturday, October 13, 7-9pm, Ohio History Center, 800 E. 17th Ave.

Author, mentor, community-based activist, and educator, Is Said provides sage leadership on a national level as well as in the greater Columbus arts community. He conceives, stages, writes, and performs unique multimedia arts events, combining visionary, historical-based poetry or prose synergistically with high-energy African music and dance. Founding the Columbus-based “Advance Party” in 1973, he brings to life a powerful, spiritual vision to inspire, inform, and empower diverse audiences. With an inclusive multicultural approach, Is Said serves formally and informally as consultant to many arts agencies and individuals, seeking his wisdom born of a lifetime of community experience. He shares his expertise with school-age or homeless youth, growing artists, and senior citizens, conducting educational workshops that foster literacy, creativity, performance skills, and, most importantly, self-awareness. Is Said received the King Arts Complex 24th Annual Legends and Legacies Award in 2011.

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