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Photo of black woman smiling with her hand by her cheek and lots of white flowers in her hair

Monday, June 11, 6-8pm, The Vanderelli Room, 218 McDowell St.

Pride started as a riot — and Marsha P. Johnson, legendary Black trans activist and elder, was there to see it through. Marsha worked throughout her life to protect and support transgender youth and sex workers, building S.T.A.R. [Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries] to serve and house her community. She wasn’t about white-washed and exclusive gay “movements” — and neither are we.

Marsha’s work paved the way for Black trans organizers today — and her politics are at the root of Columbus Community Pride. Join us on Monday, June 11, at the Vanderelli Room, for a celebration of Marsha. Learn about her legacy and impact, and work alongside community members to create a collaborative art project.

This is an all-ages event; families (including chosen family) are encouraged!

This event will feature:

• Art and information about Marsha’s life and contributions

• A talk and discussion of Marsha’s legacy

• A collaborative, community collage to celebrate what Marsha means to us today — QTIPOC especially are encouraged to contribute!

• Flower crown crafts for kids (and the young at heart), as a tribute to the beautiful crown of flowers that Marsha wore.

This event is part of a series of celebrations called Columbus Community Pride. Stonewall Columbus’ Pride isn’t safe for LGBTQIA+ people of color so we created Columbus Community Pride to bring Pride back to its radical roots and to support all people. Learn more at columbuscommunitypride.org and follow each event on our Google calendar at tinyurl.com/yckopfy2 and the full “Columbus Community Pride 2018: Back to Our Roots” Facebook event.

This event is a safer space; we will not tolerate racism, transphobia, homophobia or any other form of discrimination or hatred.

Hosted by Black Queer and Intersectional Columbus [BQIC].

In conjunction with Columbus Community Pride 2018: Back to Our Roots.

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